Menu: Skip within this page

 

SBN FEEDBACK

Please provide feedback on the SBN website.

MPC FEEDBACK

Please provide feedback on the MPC website.

Hubble Space Telescope Instruments

This page contains a listing of the instruments (current and past) on the Hubble Space Telescope (HST). The main HST website provides the full documentation of the individual instruments. Note that the descriptions below were taken from that documentation.

IDNameDescription
ACSAdvanced Camera for SurveysACS uses one or more large-format detectors in each channel. The WFC detector, called ACS/WFC, employs a mosaic of two 2048 x 4096 Scientific Imaging Technologies (SITe) CCDs, with ~0.049 arcsecond pixels, covering a nominal ~202 x 202 arcsecond field of view, and a spectral response from ~3700 to 11,000 Å. The HRC detector, called ACS/HRC, is a 1024 x 1024 SITe CCD, with ~0.028 x 0.025 arcsecond pixels, covering a nominal 29 x 25 arcsecond field of view, and spectral response from ~2000 to 11,000 Å. The SBC detector, called the ACS/SBC, is a solar-blind CsI Multi-Anode Microchannel Array (MAMA), with 1024 x 1024 ~0.034 x 0.030 arcsecond pixels, and a nominal 35 x 31 arcsecond field of view, with far-UV spectral response from ~1150 to 1700 Å.
COSCosmic Origins SpectrographThe Cosmic Origins Spectrograph (COS) was installed on the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) in May 2009. COS is designed to perform high-sensitivity, medium- and low-resolution spectroscopy of astronomical objects in the 1150-3200 Å wavelength range. COS significantly enhances the spectroscopic capabilities of HST at ultraviolet wavelengths, providing observers with unparalleled opportunities for observing faint sources of ultraviolet light.
FGSFine Guidance SensorsThe Fine Guidance Sensors, in addition to being an integral part of the HST Pointing Control System (PCS), provide HST observers with the capability of precision astrometry and milliarcsecond resolution over a wide range of magnitudes (3 < V < 16.8). Its two observing modes x Position Mode and Transfer Mode x have been used to determine the parallax and proper motion of astrometric targets to a precision of 0.2 mas, and to detect duplicity or structure around targets as close as 8 mas (visual orbits can be determined for binaries as close as 12 mas).
FOCFaint Object Camera The Faint Object Camera (FOC) was one of the 4 original axial instruments aboard the Hubble Space Telescope (HST). The FOC was designed to take imaging observations of astrophysical sources from the near ultraviolet to the near infrared (1150 to 6500 Angstroms). The instrument was removed from HST during Servicing Mission 3B in March, 2002.
FOSFaint Object SpectrographThe Faint Object Spectrograph (FOS) was one of the 4 original axial instruments aboard the Hubble Space Telescope (HST). The FOS was designed to make spectroscopic observations of astrophysical sources from the near ultraviolet to the near infrared (1150 x 8000 Angstroms). The instrument was removed from HST during the Second Servicing Mission in February 1997.
HRS (GHRS)Goddard High Resolution SpectrographThe Goddard High-Resolution Spectrograph (GHRS) was one of the 4 original axial instruments aboard the Hubble Space Telescope (HST). The GHRS was designed to take spectral observations of astrophysical sources from 1150 to 3200 Angstroms. The instrument was removed from HST during Servicing Mission 2 in February, 1997.
HSPHigh Speed PhotometerThe High Speed Photometer (HSP) was one of the four original axial instruments on the Hubble Space Telescope (HST). The HSP was designed to make very rapid photometric observations of astrophysical sources in a variety of filters and passbands from the near ultraviolet to the visible. The HSP was removed from HST during the First Servicing Mission in December, 1993.
NICMOSNear Infrared Camera and Multi Object SpectrometerThe Near Infrared Camera and Multi-Object Spectrometer (NICMOS) provides imaging capabilities in broad, medium, and narrow band filters, broad-band imaging polarimetry, coronographic imaging, and slitless grism spectroscopy, in the wavelength range 0.8-2.5 microns. NICMOS has three adjacent but not contiguous cameras, designed to operate independently, each with a dedicated array at a different magnification scale.
STISSpace Telescope Imaging SpectrographSTIS has three large-format (1024 x 1024 pixel) detectors: CCD: Scientific Image Technologies (SITe) CCD with ~0.05 arcsecond square pixels, covering a nominal 52 x 52 arcsecond square field of view (FOV), operating from ~2000 to 10,300 Å. NUV-MAMA: Cs2Te Multi-Anode Microchannel Array (MAMA) detector with ~0.024 arcsecond square pixels, and a nominal 25 x 25 arcsecond square field of view (FOV), operating in the near ultraviolet from 1600 to 3100 Å. FUV-MAMA: Solar-blind CsI MAMA with ~0.024 arcsec-pixels, and a nominal 25 x 25 arcsecond square FOV, operating in the far ultraviolet from 1150 to 1700 Å.
WFC3Wide Field Camera 3The optical design of WFC3 features two independent channels, one sensitive at ultraviolet (UV) and optical wavelengths, approximately 200 to 1000 nm (the UVIS channel), and the other sensitive at near infrared (IR) wavelengths, approximately 850 to 1700 nm (the IR channel).
WFPC (WF/PC-1)Wide Field Planetary Camera 1The Wide-Field Planetary Camera 1 (WF/PC-1) was used from April 1990 to November 1993, to obtain high resolution images of astronomical objects over a relatively wide field of view and a broad range of wavelengths (1150 to 11,000 Angstroms). WF/PC-1 was replaced by WFPC2 during the First Servicing Mission to HST in 1993.
WFPC2Wide Field Planetary Camera 2The Wide-Field Planetary Camera 2 (WFPC2) is used to obtain high resolution images of astronomical objects over a relatively wide field of view and a broad range of wavelengths (1150 to 11,000 Å).